Schiff M et al. Does adolescent's exposure to parental intimate partner conflict and violence predict psychological distress and substance use in young adulthood? A longitudinal study. Child Abuse Negl. 2014 Dec;38(12):1945-54. Epub 2014 Jul 28.PMID:25082429.

Child Abuse Negl. 2014 Dec;38(12):1945-54. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2014.07.001. Epub 2014 Jul 28.

Does adolescent's exposure to parental intimate partner conflict and violence predict psychological distress and substance use in young adulthood? A longitudinal study.

Schiff M(1), Plotnikova M(2), Dingle K(3), Williams GM(4), Najman J(4), Clavarino A(5).

Author information:
(1)Hebrew University, Jerusalem, School of Social Work and Social Welfare, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905, Israel. Electronic address: miriam.schiff@mail.huji.ac.il.
(2)School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Australia; School of Social Science, University of Queensland, Australia.
(3)Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
(4)School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Australia.
(5)School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, Australia.

Little is known about the extent to which parental conflict and violence differentially impact on offspring mental health and substance use. Using data from a longitudinal birth cohort study this paper examines: whether offspring exposure to parental intimate partner violence (involving physical violence which may include conflicts and/or disagreements) or parental intimate partner conflict (conflicting interactions and disagreements only) are associated with offspring depression, anxiety and substance use in early adulthood (at age 21); and whether these associations are independent of maternal background, depression and anxiety and substance use. Data (n=2,126 women and children) were taken from a large-scale Australian birth-cohort study, the Mater University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP). IPC and IPV were measured at the 14-year follow-up. Offspring mental health outcomes--depression, anxiety and substance use—were assessed at the 21-year follow-up using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Offspring of women experiencing IPV at the 14-year follow-up were more likely to manifest anxiety, nicotine, alcohol and cannabis disorders by the 21-year follow-up. These associations remained after adjustment for maternal anxiety, depression, and other potential confounders. Unlike males who experience anxiety disorders after exposure to IPV, females experience depressive and alcohol use disorders. IPV predicts offspring increased levels of substance abuse and dependence in young adulthood. Gender differences suggest differential impact.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 25082429  [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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