Dankner R, Shanik M, Roth J, Luski A, Lubin F, Chetrit A. Sex and ethnic-origin specific BMI cutpoints improve prediction of forty year mortality: the Israel GOH Study. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2015 Feb 17. doi:10.1002/dmrr.2642. PubMed PMID: 25689480.

Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2015 Feb 17. doi: 10.1002/dmrr.2642. [Epub ahead of print]

Sex and ethnic-origin specific BMI cutpoints improve prediction of forty year mortality: the Israel GOH Study.

Dankner R(1), Shanik M, Roth J, Luski A, Lubin F, Chetrit A.

Author information:
(1)Unit for cardiovascular epidemiology, The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, 52621, Israel; Department for Epidemiology and Prevention, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Patient Oriented Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, NY, 11030, USA. rdankner@post.tau.ac.il.

BACKGROUND: Although obesity has been associated with a higher risk for premature death, the sex and ethnic-origin specific BMI levels that are associated with increased mortality are controversial. We investigated the 40-year cumulative all-cause-mortality, in relation to the BMI in adult life, among men and women originating from Yemen, Europe/America, Middle-East, and North Africa, using sex and ethnic-origin specific BMI cutpoints.

METHODS: A random stratified cohort (n=5,710) was sampled from the Central Population Registry, and followed since 1969 for vital status. Weight, height, and blood pressure were measured and smoking status was recorded at baseline. BMI was analyzed according to conventional categories, and according to sex and ethnic-origin specific quintiles.

RESULTS: Elevated and significant mortality hazard ratios of 1.21 (95%CI 1.00-1.45) for females and 1.22 (95%CI 1.03 - 1.44) for males were found for the highest origin-specific BMI quintile. In males, the lowest ethnic-origin specific quintile was also significantly associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio of 1.22 95%CI 1.03-1.45), adjusting for age, smoking and blood pressure. Obesity was associated with mortality in non-smokers (HR=1.29, 95%CI 1.04-1.61 in males and HR=1.46, 95%CI 1.19-1.79 in females), whereas leanness was associated with mortality only among smoking men (HR=1.39, 95%CI 1.09-1.77).

CONCLUSION: Refinement of BMI categories using country of origin specific quintiles demonstrated significantly increased mortality in the upper quintile in both sexes, while according to the conventional values this association did not prevail in men. We propose the establishment of sex and origin-specific BMI categories when setting goals for disease prevention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 25689480  [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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