Erez A, Segev A, Medvedofsky D, Fefer P, Raanani E, Goldenberg I, Guetta V. Factors affecting survival in men versus women following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Am J Cardiol. 2014 Feb 15;113(4):701-5. PMID: 24342761.

Am J Cardiol. 2014 Feb 15;113(4):701-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.10.047. Epub 2013 Nov 23.

Factors affecting survival in men versus women following transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

Erez A(1), Segev A(2), Medvedofsky D(2), Fefer P(2), Raanani E(2), Goldenberg I(2), Guetta V(2).

Author information:
(1)Heart Institute, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: aharon.erez@gmail.com.

(2)Heart Institute, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Although transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis is becoming an established technique, the impact of gender-related differences remains unclear. Two hundred twenty-four consecutive patients undergoing TAVI were prospectively followed up in a tertiary medical center. The primary end point of the present study was all-cause mortality at 2 years of follow-up. Interaction-term analysis was used to identify gender-specific predictors of mortality after TAVI. Fifty-seven percent of the study patients were women. Age was similar (82 ± 7 years). Compared with men, women had a lower frequency of coronary artery disease (CAD) and a higher baseline left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The cumulative probability of all-cause mortality was significantly lower among women (8.6%) compared with men (26.8%; log-rank p value <0.001). A lower baseline LVEF (<45%) was associated with a significant, more than fourfold (p = 0.0019 and 0.048, respectively), increase in mortality risk among both men and women (p value for gender-by-LVEF interaction = 0.87). In contrast, the risk associated with the presence of previous CAD was shown to be gender related. Thus, in women, CAD was associated with a pronounced >14-fold increase in mortality risk, whereas in men, CAD was not associated with a significant mortality risk (p value for gender-by-LVEF interaction = 0.01). In conclusion, our findings suggest that risk assessment before TAVI should consider gender-specific differences in survival and risk factors.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 24342761 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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