Moses L, Katz N, Weizman A. Metabolic profiles in adults with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities. Eur Psychiatry. 2014 Sep;29(7):397-401. PubMed PMID: 23849396.

Eur Psychiatry. 2014 Sep;29(7):397-401. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2013.05.005. Epub 2013 Jul 9.

Metabolic profiles in adults with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities.

Moses L(1), Katz N(2), Weizman A(3).

Author information:
(1)Health Services, Division for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Ministry of Social Affairs and Social Services, Jerusalem, Israel; Maccabi Health Services, South District, Israel. Electronic address: lilachmoses@yahoo.com.
(2)Geha Mental Health Center, Petah Tikva and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
(3)Geha Mental Health Center, Petah Tikva and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Laboratory of Biological Psychiatry, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Petah Tikva, Israel.

INTRODUCTION: Low levels of blood cholesterol have been found in some children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Psychotropic medications, commonly used by people with ASD and people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are frequently associated with altered metabolic profiles.

PURPOSE: We aimed to compare metabolic features of adults with ASD or ID with those of a community-based population.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Data on blood fasting glucose (FBG), lipid profile, liver enzyme profile, TSH, BMI, medications and diagnoses of 80 adults with ASD, 77 adults with ID and 828 control adults were drawn from medical charts/database. Candidates that used glucose or lipid lowering medications were not included.

RESULTS: Total-cholesterol levels of people with ASD and ID were significantly lower than those of the controls (168.3 ± 32.78, 168.2 ± 32.91, 185.4 ± 40.49 mg/dL, respectively, P<0.001) but after adjusting for gender, age and BMI and using Bonferroni correction, the significance was lost. Compared to controls, ASD and ID had significantly lower FBG (by -14.45 ± 1.81, -14.58 ± 1.54 mg/dl, respectively; P<0.001 for both) and liver enzymes, despite using psychotropic medications.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: In contrast to other psychiatric patients receiving similar medications, people with ASD and ID have unaltered lipid profiles and lower glucose and liver enzyme levels compared to a community-based population.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

PMID: 23849396  [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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