Gordon B, Shamiss A, Derazne E, Tzur D, Afek A. Sex differences in the association between body mass index and hypertension - a cross-sectional study in 717 812 adolescents. Pediatr Obes. 2015 Apr 27. PubMed PMID: 25917570.

Pediatr Obes. 2015 Apr 27. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12029. [Epub ahead of print]

Sex differences in the association between body mass index and hypertension – a cross-sectional study in 717 812 adolescents.

Gordon B(1), Shamiss A, Derazne E, Tzur D, Afek A.

Author information:
(1)Israeli Defense Force Medical Corps, Tel Hashomer, Israel; The Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

In order to examine sex-specific differences in the association of body mass index (BMI) and hypertension, we conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 717 812 (402 914 men and 314 898 women) Israeli Jewish adolescents aged 16.0-19.99 years medically screened for military service. A diagnosis of hypertension was established per history or if a mean of 10 separate blood pressure measurements exceeded 140/90, following an initial measurement higher than 140/90. Weight and height were measured. Prevalence of hypertension was 0.42% in men and 0.05% in women. In men, BMI was significantly associated with hypertension from the third decile (odds ratio [OR] 1.67, 1.06-2.65) up to the 10th decile (OR 30.17, 20.83-43.69). In women, we observed a significantly increased risk for hypertension in the ninth decile (OR 3.82, 1.42-10.22) and in the 10th decile (OR 18.92, 7.7-46.51), with no visible trend in lower deciles. BMI effects on hypertension prevalence are different in male and female adolescents.

© 2015 World Obesity.

PMID: 25917570  [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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