Erez G, Pilver CE, Potenza MN. Gender-related differences in the associations between sexual impulsivity and psychiatric disorders. J Psychiatr Res. 2014 Apr 19. pii: S0022-3956(14)00115-0. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.04.009. PMID: 24793538.

J Psychiatr Res. 2014 Apr 19. pii: S0022-3956(14)00115-0. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.04.009. [Epub ahead of print]

Gender-related differences in the associations between sexual impulsivity and psychiatric disorders.

Erez G(1), Pilver CE(2), Potenza MN(3).

Author information:
(1)Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Shalvata Mental Health Center, Hod Hasharon, Israel, Affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: galit.erez1@gmail.com.
(2)Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
(3)Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

OBJECTIVE: Sexual impulsivity (SI) has been associated with conditions that have substantial public health costs, such as sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. However, SI has not been examined systematically with respect to its relationships to psychopathology. We aimed to investigate associations between SI and psychopathology, including gender-related differences.

METHOD: We performed a secondary data analysis of Wave-2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national sample of 34,653 adults in the United States. DSM-IV-based diagnoses of mood, anxiety, drug and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Scheduled DSM-IV Version.

RESULTS: The prevalence of SI was considerable (14.7%), with greater acknowledgment by men than women (18.9% versus 10.9%; p < 0.0001). For both women and men, SI was positively associated with most Axis-I and Axis-II psychiatric disorders (OR range: Women, Axis-I:1.89-6.14, Axis-II:2.10-10.02; Men, Axis-I:1.92-6.21, Axis-II:1.63-6.05). Significant gender-related differences were observed. Among women as compared to men, SI was more strongly associated with social phobia, alcohol abuse/dependence, and paranoid, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders.

CONCLUSION: The robust associations between SI and psychopathology across genders suggest the need for screening and interventions related to SI for individuals with psychiatric concerns. The stronger associations between SI and psychopathology among women as compared to men emphasize the importance of a gender-oriented perspective in targeting SI. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the extent to SI predates, postdates or co-occurs with specific psychiatric conditions.

Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID: 24793538  [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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